Akemi Dawn Bowman :: STARFISH

I’m excited to share the September interview in the Debut-to-Debut Series! I’ve been talking to a fantastic group of debut young adult novelists this year, and that will continue throughout the rest of 2017, 2018, and 2019—the year leading up to, during, and following my own debut. I’m so excited to share these books, and insights into these authors’ experiences, with you. You can find all the interviews in the series collected right here.

I recently corresponded with Akemi Dawn Bowman  about her debut young adult novel Starfish (S&S/Simon Pulse, September 2017).

From the jacket:

Kiko Himura has always had a hard time saying exactly what she’s thinking. With a mother who makes her feel unremarkable and a half-Japanese heritage she doesn’t quite understand, Kiko prefers to keep her head down, certain that once she makes it into her dream art school, Prism, her real life will begin.

But then Kiko doesn’t get into Prism, at the same time her abusive uncle moves back in with her family. So when she receives an invitation from her childhood friend to leave her small town and tour art schools on the west coast, Kiko jumps at the opportunity in spite of the anxieties and fears that attempt to hold her back. And now that she is finally free to be her own person outside the constricting walls of her home life, Kiko learns life-changing truths about herself, her past, and how to be brave.

From debut author Akemi Dawn Bowman comes a luminous, heartbreaking story of identity, family, and the beauty that emerges when we embrace our true selves.

KIT FRICK: Recent high school graduate Kiko Himura is a visual artist. Throughout the novel, the reader gains access to her drawings via the brief descriptions that conclude most chapters. I found this to be an extremely effective narrative strategy for giving us insight into how Kiko is processing the chapter’s events both artistically and emotionally. Can you tell us a bit about how you landed on this recurring narrative element and how you yourself imagined Kiko’s art so that the reader could, in turn, connect with Kiko on this level?

AKEMI DAWN BOWMAN: Kiko often struggles to say exactly what she wants to, even when the words for what she’s feeling are already in her head. I wanted to give her an outlet for her feelings, and art just felt like a natural progression. Because with art, she doesn’t have to speak—she can simply release her feelings onto a page or canvas, and I think there’s a real freedom there that Kiko doesn’t get anywhere else. I imagined Kiko’s art to be emotional, surreal, and inspired by elements like stars, animals, and nature, but they’re intentionally short in their descriptions so that the reader can come up with their own ideas of what her paintings and drawings look like. (Also, I’m not going to lie, it was always a big dream of mine to have a book that might inspire readers to create fanart. I will probably pass out with excitement if it ever actually happens!)

KIT: Tell us about the process of developing the adults in Kiko’s life, who range from the wildly insensitive (her mom) to the oblivious (her dad) to the despicable (her uncle) to the wonderfully supportive (the artist Hiroshi). Did their roles evolve organically as you created Kiko’s world, or did you have a specific plan for how this adult cast might function to both challenge and facilitate Kiko’s path toward identity formation and bravery?

AKEMI: I knew early on who these adults would be, and the role they’d play in Kiko’s journey. But out of the four of them, I think Kiko’s dad evolved in a really important way over the course of writing and revising. He was less present in the first draft, but I have an incredible editor who knew which strings to tug to weave him further into Kiko’s story. And I’m really grateful she did, because the scenes with Kiko’s dad are some of the most insightful when it comes to Kiko’s struggle with her identity.

KIT: Tell us something about Starfish that isn’t apparent from the book cover or flap copy. We want the inside scoop!

AKEMI: It seems so strange now, but in the original draft, Emery didn’t exist at all! Kiko didn’t have a single friend, so on top of her home life and the anxieties she was battling through, she was also struggling with a horrible sense of loneliness. I ended up getting some generous feedback from an editor a little while later suggesting Kiko’s life was almost too bleak for a reader to connect with, so I gave her a friend. I love Emery and I’m so glad she’s a part of this story and Kiko’s life. I do think loneliness and not having friends at school is something that is very real, and I’d love to address that in a future novel. It just wasn’t right for Starfish!

KIT: What gives you the most joy about your life as a YA writer right now? What’s bringing you satisfaction at this moment in time?

AKEMI: Starfish releases soon, and that gives me so much joy but also so much anxiety. At the moment, I’m so wrapped up in promotion and edits for Book 2 that it’s a bit of a whirlwind, to be honest. But I try to remember to take a moment to feel accomplished now and then, instead of constantly worrying about all the potential failures to come. It’s hard to do when reviews are trickling in and the release date is getting closer, but I think it’s important. Writers hear “no” so many times throughout this process, and I think sometimes you have to counter that by celebrating all the good news. I’m not always good about that part, but I’m trying!

KIT: The publishing journey is unique for every author, but it’s safe to say that the road to book publication is filled with surprises, twists, and turns for all of us. What has surprised you most about the process of putting a first book into the world?

AKEMI: Definitely how quiet it can be during the months between “deal announcement” and “publication.” There’s a lot of waiting, which is why patience is an absolute must! There’s such an explosion of excitement after you get a book deal, and I think the extreme quiet that follows can be a bit terrifying for first-time authors. Chocolate and staying focused on writing helps!

I was also hugely surprised by how unbelievably kind and enthusiastic complete strangers on the internet can be. I never in a million years imagined people would be talking about Starfish the way they have and connecting with Kiko’s story on such a deep level. It’s meant the absolute world, and to have people actually reaching out to share their reactions with me—I’m just incredibly grateful and honored.

KIT: Drawing from your own unique experience, what advice would you to give to future young adult debut authors, or debut novelists in general?

AKEMI: Take deep breaths, remember it’s not a race, and always be working on the next book. So much of this industry and what happens with your book will be out of your control. But the one thing you can control? When your next book gets finished. So, stay focused and do what you do best: write.

 

Akemi Dawn Bowman is the author of Starfish. She’s a proud Ravenclaw and Star Wars enthusiast, who served in the US Navy for five years and has a BA in social sciences from UNLV. Originally from Las Vegas, she currently lives in England with her husband, two children, and their Pekingese mix. Starfish is out now (9/26/17, Simon Pulse/Simon & Schuster), with Summer Bird Blue, a second YA contemporary, to follow in Fall 2018. She is represented by Penny Moore of Empire Literary.

Website | Twitter | Tumblr

 

Kit Frick is a novelist, poet, and MacDowell Colony fellow. Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, she studied creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College and received her MFA from Syracuse University. When she isn’t putting complicated characters in impossible situations, Kit edits poetry and literary fiction for a small press, edits for private clients, and mentors emerging writers through Pitch Wars. Her debut young adult novel is See All the Stars (Simon & Schuster / Margaret K. McElderry Books, summer 2018), and her debut full-length poetry collection is A Small Rising Up in the Lungs (New American Press, fall 2018).

Starfish is out now and is available wherever books are sold. Allow me to recommend your local indie, in addition to Barnes & Noble and Amazon.

   

Stop back soon for future posts in the Debut-to-Debut Interview Series. I’ll be talking to Nic Stone, Amy Giles, and more fantastic authors throughout the fall, winter, and beyond!

Rebecca Barrow :: YOU DON’T KNOW ME BUT I KNOW YOU

I’m excited to share the fifth interview in the Debut-to-Debut Series! I’ve been talking to a fantastic group of debut young adult novelists this spring and summer, and that will continue throughout 2017, 2018, and 2019—the year leading up to, during, and following my own debut. I’m so excited to share these books, and insights into these authors’ experiences, with you. You can find all the interviews in the series collected right here.

I recently corresponded with Rebecca Barrow about her debut young adult novel You Don’t Know Me But I Know You (HarperTeen, August 2017).

From the jacket:

There’s a box in the back of Audrey’s closet that she rarely thinks about.

Inside is a letter, seventeen years old, from a mother she’s never met, handed to her by the woman she’s called Mom her whole life. Being adopted, though, is just one piece in the puzzle of Audrey’s life—the picture painstakingly put together by Audrey herself, full of all the people and pursuits that make her who she is.

But when Audrey realizes that she’s pregnant, she feels something—a tightly sealed box in the closet corners of her heart—crack open, spilling her dormant fears and unanswered questions all over the life she loves.

Almost two decades ago, a girl in Audrey’s situation made a choice, one that started Audrey’s entire story. Now Audrey is paralyzed by her own what-ifs and terrified by the distance she feels growing between her and her best friend Rose. Down every possible path is a different unfamiliar version of her life, and as she weighs the options in her mind, she starts to wonder—what does it even mean to be Audrey Spencer?

KIT FRICK: When seventeen-year-old Audrey learns she’s pregnant, she and her boyfriend Julian are faced with a complex decision: What happens next? While the choice ultimately rests with Audrey, it’s not a decision she makes in a vacuum, and the people in Audrey’s life support and challenge her in different ways. Tell us a bit about creating Audrey’s network of family and friends: Were there specific voices you wanted Audrey to hear throughout the course of the novel? Any ideas about teen pregnancy that, as a writer, you worked to challenge, elevate, or overturn?

REBECCA BARROW: In all honestly, I didn’t have any idea of specific voices I wanted Audrey to hear from. She actually doesn’t tell many people about the pregnancy, and the people she does speak to are all supportive and tell her that whatever she decides, they’ll be there for her. Although that itself was a pretty specific choice I made—I wanted to surround her with supportive voices. Firstly because I think anyone who becomes pregnant should be given that grace and it infuriates me that in reality that’s not what always happens, and secondly, because it almost pushes Audrey into having to make this choice by herself. Or not by herself, for herself. She doesn’t have her parents or friends or boyfriend telling her what to do or pushing her in one specific direction, so she can’t lean on that (even though she does take their words into consideration). Audrey has to take everything she hears and every thought of her own, and figure out by herself what she wants to do.

The one person I did want Audrey to hear from was someone who she knows has been in this same position as her before—her birth mother. I won’t go too much into detail about what happens between them, but it was important to me to show the impact they still have on each other, seventeen years after everything.

KIT: You Don’t Know Me But I Know You is, at its core, a novel about difficult choices and the process of discovering—and deciding—who you are and what your future will hold. Audrey’s story is uniquely hers, yet adolescence is a time of identity formation and big decisions for many teens. What about the idea of shaping one’s own identity—both with the cards you’re dealt and the ones you deal yourself—appeals to you on an authorial and/or personal level?

REBECCA: I think writing about who you are and who you want to become really appeals to me because so often, we are told who and what we’re supposed to be. Especially when you’re young; there’s so much talk and assumption about the path you’re going to follow, and so little room given for people to actually figure things out for themselves. Then there’s the assumptions that come because of your gender, your race, your sexuality, your economic background…I love to see people pushing back against those assumptions, giving all of it the middle finger and becoming wholly themselves.

I find myself writing about characters who are yearning for big things. There’s a point in life, I feel like, when we switch from telling people that they can do anything they dream, to saying that they need to be “realistic.” I don’t think the two are necessarily mutually exclusive, and I like exploring that.

And I really like the idea that we can constantly be shifting and changing who we are, what we want—as teenagers, or thirty-somethings, or at seventy years old.

KIT: Tell us something about You Don’t Know Me But I Know You that isn’t apparent from the book cover or flap copy. We want the inside scoop!

REBECCA: This book has been through a couple of transformations—it actually used to be dual POV. So Rose (Audrey’s best friend) had her own chapters and her whole storyline was explored a little more in-depth. I ended up pulling the book apart after feedback that it was really heavy and I was maybe throwing too much into this one book. I would love to go back into Rose’s story in some way one day; she’s such a complex character, and a challenge for me to write, in a good way.

Another thing: in the very first version, Audrey did not get pregnant. Her mom did!

KIT: What gives you the most joy about your life as a YA writer right now? Tell us about something that brings you satisfaction at this moment in time.

REBECCA: Right now, it’s seeing my writing get better. I love working with my editor, Elizabeth Lynch, and the way she pushes me into places I hadn’t even thought of going. I always want to challenge myself and grow, and I hope that as my career progresses, people will sense those changes in my work. It’s an amazing feeling to step back from what I’m working on and think, “Oh, wow. I’m really proud of this.”

KIT: The publishing journey is unique for every author, but it’s safe to say that the road to book publication is filled with surprises, twists, and turns for all of us. What has surprised you most about the process of putting a first book into the world?

REBECCA: The waiting! I know, I know, that’s not a surprise to anyone but me, right? We all know publishing is just waiting and secrets. But I wasn’t at all prepared for what I’ve come to think of as the lull—the time between deal announcement and the point around three months out from publication when things start happening. That time felt endless to me—the initial excitement everyone has kind of dies down, because your book’s still so far away from being out, and there’s nothing much you can say to people beyond “I’m working on edits!” It’s been a long eighteen months.

KIT: Drawing from your own unique experience, what advice would you to give to future young adult debut authors, or debut novelists in general?

REBECCA: My favourite, oft-repeated advice (that I could do with taking…) is keep your eyes on your own paper. Your career is not anyone else’s career, your book is not their book, your path is not their path. You will stress yourself out so much looking at other people’s tour dates and festival appearances and starred reviews and and and… Just because you might not have those things doesn’t mean people don’t think your book is good, or that you are not worthy, or you’re not going to be successful. There’s only so much that you the author can control, and the rest is beyond you. So focus on your writing, whatever promotion it is that you’ve decided to do, and let the rest go.

Rebecca Barrow writes stories about girls and all the wonders they can be. A lipstick obsessive with the ability to quote the entirety of Mean Girls, she lives in England, where it rains a considerable amount more than in the fictional worlds of her characters. She collects tattoos, cats, and more books than she could ever possibly read. You Don’t Know Me But I Know You is her first novel.

Website | Twitter | Instagram

Kit Frick is a novelist, poet, and MacDowell Colony fellow. Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, she studied creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College and received her MFA from Syracuse University. When she isn’t putting complicated characters in impossible situations, Kit edits poetry and literary fiction for a small press, edits for private clients, and mentors emerging writers through Pitch Wars. Her debut young adult novel is See All the Stars (Simon & Schuster / Margaret K. McElderry Books, summer 2018), and her debut full-length poetry collection is A Small Rising Up in the Lungs (New American Press, fall 2018).

You Don’t Know Me But I Know You is out now and is available wherever books are sold. Allow me to recommend your local indie, in addition to Barnes & Noble and Amazon.

   

Stop back soon for future posts in the Debut-to-Debut Interview Series. I’ll be talking to Akemi Dawn Bowman in September and more fantastic authors throughout the fall, winter, and beyond!

Emily Bain Murphy :: THE DISAPPEARANCES

I’m excited to share the fourth interview in the Debut-to-Debut Series! I’ve been talking to a fantastic group of debut young adult novelists this spring and summer, and that will continue throughout 2017, 2018, and 2019—the year leading up to, during, and following my own debut. I’m so excited to share these books, and insights into these authors’ experiences, with you. You can find all the interviews in the series collected right here.

I recently corresponded with Emily Bain Murphy about her debut young adult novel The Disappearances (HMH Books for Young Readers, July 2017).

From the jacket:

What if the ordinary things in life suddenly…disappeared?

Aila Quinn’s mother, Juliet, has always been a mystery: vibrant yet guarded, she keeps her secrets beyond Aila’s reach. When Juliet dies, Aila and her younger brother Miles are sent to live in Sterling, a rural town far from home—and the place where Juliet grew up.

Sterling is a place with mysteries of its own. A place where the experiences that weave life together—scents of flowers and food, reflections from mirrors and lakes, even the ability to dream—vanish every seven years.

No one knows what caused these “Disappearances,” or what will slip away next. But Sterling always suspected that Juliet Quinn was somehow responsible—and Aila must bear the brunt of their blame while she follows the chain of literary clues her mother left behind.

As the next Disappearance nears, Aila begins to unravel the dual mystery of why the Disappearances happen and who her mother truly was. One thing is clear: Sterling isn’t going to hold on to anyone’s secrets for long before it starts giving them up. 

KIT FRICK: One of my favorite experiences as a reader was discovering the many Variants developed by the residents of the sister towns to counteract—and sometimes even enhance—the ordinary things that have vanished from their lives. If you could try out one Atoning or Enhancing Variant yourself, which would it be and why?

EMILY BAIN MURPHY: Ooh, such a good question! Let’s see. I do love the idea of being able to walk around in a rainstorm and feel as dry and warm as sitting in front of a fireplace. But I guess I’d have to choose the Tempest Variants. I would absolutely love to know what it feels like to have water turn to road under the soles of my feet—especially if it was on a glassy lake or ocean where you could see down to the bottom.

KIT: The Disappearances is set in the small town of Sterling against the backdrop of World War II. While the story’s premise is fantastical and brimming with magic and mystery, the setting itself feels very realistically conceived. Tell us a bit about the research and/or imagination that went into in developing Aila’s world—both the historical world of the 1940s and also the unique small town setting.

EMILY: Thank you, that’s so nice! Oh yes, there was so much research—everything from looking at 1940s advertisements on Pinterest to reading Life Magazine features on teenagers’ lives in small-town America during World War II. I looked at slang, fashion designs, car models, which songs were playing on the radio, and what world events were appearing in newspaper headlines on the days I’d mapped out the story. I also interviewed my grandfather, who was stationed on a naval supply ship in the Pacific during World War II. He had so many good anecdotes about everything from stopping at a pineapple factory in Hawaii on the way out, to how the mail system worked, so I’d know how often Aila could expect to receive letters from her father. I’m glad the details rang true for you—and I am glad that because of this book, I got to glimpse a little of my grandfather’s life that I might not have otherwise.

KIT: Tell us something about The Disappearances that isn’t apparent from the book cover or flap copy. We want the inside scoop!

EMILY: I killed off three characters and a sport I invented, as well as my entire original ending. What’s interesting is that my own journey of discovery for the plot actually mirrored Aila’s, in the end. It involved multiple rewrites and even more research once I “discovered” the mystery, but I’m so happy with how it turned out, and I think it’s kind of a fun twist you’d never know from reading the flap copy.

KIT: What gives you the most joy about your life as a YA writer right now? Tell us about something that brings you satisfaction at this moment in time.

EMILY: The most joy I have right now is when I hear reader feedback about what The Disappearances means to them. If it touched something in them, or made them feel happy or hopeful, or just gave them a little piece of joy for a few hours—that is so meaningful to me. Also, holding this book in my hands and seeing it in the bookstore is such an incredible feeling, after years of work spent and pieces of my heart poured into it, and some dark days spent in the query trenches wondering if it could ever really happen!

KIT: The publishing journey is unique for every author, but it’s safe to say that the road to book publication is filled with surprises, twists, and turns for all of us. What has surprised you most about the process of putting a first book into the world?

EMILY: I’d say the greatest surprise has been the deep friendships I’ve found in the book world, and how wonderful it feels to have other people who know exactly what the debut experience feels like, in all of its highs and lows. Also, it’s surprising how vulnerable you feel when the book first starts to go out to readers—and how differently people can experience the exact same words written in the exact same book!

KIT: Drawing from your own unique experience, what advice would you to give to future young adult debut authors, or debut novelists in general?

EMILY: Persevere!! Get that first draft down, and don’t worry that it’s a mess. You will find the real gold in it when you’re revising—and go into it prepared to revise A LOT. Every time you revise you can shade in the details, and make themes more prominent, and deepen your characters or your plot. I’m such a perfectionist, so reminding myself of that actually helps to lighten the burden and gives me more freedom to just write. My other advice? Celebrate every small achievement. It’s not silly—it’s how you’re going to sustain through the long haul. And celebrate other people, too! Choose to lift up and cheer other writers who are seeing success instead of giving into (very human) feelings of bitterness or jealousy. You’ll be so much happier overall—and someday, it’s going to be your turn. If you persevere—see point one again. 😉

Thank you so much for having me, Kit!

Emily Bain Murphy grew up in Indiana, Hong Kong, and Tokyo, and has also called Massachusetts, Connecticut, and California home. She loves books, Japanese karaoke, exploring new cities, and anything with Nutella. Her debut YA fantasy, The Disappearances, releases from HMH Books for Young Readers and Pushkin Press in 2017.

Murphy is represented by Peter Knapp at Park Literary & Media. She currently lives in the St. Louis area with her family and is at work on her second novel.

Website | Twitter | Instagram

Kit Frick is a novelist, poet, and MacDowell Colony fellow. Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, she studied creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College and received her MFA from Syracuse University. When she isn’t putting complicated characters in impossible situations, Kit edits poetry and literary fiction for a small press, edits for private clients, and mentors emerging writers through Pitch Wars. Her debut young adult novel is See All the Stars (Simon & Schuster / Margaret K. McElderry Books, summer 2018), and her debut full-length poetry collection is A Small Rising Up in the Lungs (New American Press, fall 2018).

The Disappearances is out now and is available wherever books are sold. Allow me to recommend your local indie, in addition to Barnes & Noble and Amazon.

Stop back soon for future posts in the Debut-to-Debut Interview Series. I’ll be talking to Rebecca Barrow in August and more fantastic authors in the fall, winter, and beyond!

Kayla Olson :: THE SANDCASTLE EMPIRE

Welcome to the third interview in the Debut-to-Debut Series! I’ve been talking to a fantastic group of debut young adult novelists this spring and summer, and that will continue throughout 2017, 2018, and 2019—the year leading up to, during, and following my own debut. I’m so excited to share these books, and insights into these authors’ experiences, with you. You can find all the interviews in the series collected right here.

Earlier this month, I corresponded with Kayla Olson about her debut young adult novel The Sandcastle Empire (HarperTeen, June 2017).

From the jacket:

Before the war, Eden’s life was easy. Then the revolution happened, and everything changed.

Now a powerful group called the Wolfpack controls the earth and its resources. And even though Eden has lost everything to them, she refuses to die by their hands. She knows the coordinates to the only neutral ground left in the world, a place called Sanctuary Island, and she is desperate to escape to its shores.

Eden finally reaches the island and meets others resistant to the Wolves. But the solace is short-lived when one of Eden’s new friends goes missing. Braving the jungle in search of their lost ally, they quickly discover Sanctuary is filled with lethal traps and an enemy they never expected.

This island might be deadlier than the world Eden left behind, but surviving it is the only thing that stands between her and freedom.

KIT FRICK: Tell us a little about the research you did for The Sandcastle Empire. For instance, digital, medical, and mechanical innovations, and environmental resources such as silk and water, all play an important role in the world building for the novel, which is set in a post-revolutionary near future. What kind of research was necessary in order to construct Eden’s world, and what was born out of pure creativity?

KAYLA OLSON: Ooh, I don’t remember anyone asking this question before, and I’m glad you asked! Much of the future tech in my book was inspired by sifting through TEDtalks—silk technology, for example, is a real thing (watch this incredible video by Fiorenzo Omenetto to see what I mean), and the Havenwater bottles were inspired in part by Michael Pritchard’s Lifesaver filter (here’s his TEDtalk, “How to make filthy water drinkable”). I was also fascinated by Rachel Armstrong’s ideas on how to make architecture that grows itself. I loved the idea of future technology being the opposite of the flash and shine we often associate with it; for a book that had strong environmental themes as its foundation, I looked specifically for solutions to current problems that have sprung up out of nature. The world I built for The Sandcastle Empire was a world where these ideas had caught on—and then proved to be both beneficial and problematic to society.

KIT: The novel imagines a world in which a group comprised of members of the lower socio-economic class—known as the Wolfpack—are now in power following a violent revolution, and the surviving members of the once wealthy elite, including Eden, must struggle to resist their captors’ hostile control. There is a notable reversal at play here, wherein the oppressed have become the oppressors, and vice versa. Tell us a little about the role that class and the distribution of wealth played in your development of the novel.

KAYLA: As I started to envision a world where multiple cities, all along the coastlines, were attempting to recover from simultaneous disasters, it seemed like the sort of thing where emergency response teams might have a hard time keeping up—especially if more floods happened before the cities could recover from the previous ones. In this situation, I imagined how scarce the resources for food, shelter, and clean water might become, and how there are people out there who might try to take advantage of that sort of thing by charging extremely high prices for the essentials necessary to survive—and how those who couldn’t afford the resources would be, rightly, enraged. From there, it’s a question of How do we survive? How do we keep our families alive? So the desperate do what they feel they have to. The role reversal, at its heart, is a matter of fear taken to the extreme—a handful of power-hungry, persuasive individuals who slip in to the movement to take advantage of the desperate who truly do want justice, and end up twisting things for their own personal gain.

KIT: Tell us something about The Sandcastle Empire that isn’t apparent from the book cover or flap copy. We want the inside scoop!

KAYLA: Unless you’ve listened to the recent interview I did with Sarah Enni on her podcast (here, if you’d like to check it out!), you’re probably not aware that one of my initial idea sparks for The Sandcastle Empire came from thinking about pirates…and the thing that put pirates in my head at all was a Wii MarioKart track, ha! (Shy Guy Beach, specifically—there’s a pirate ship off in the distance.) I happened to play that course on the same day my little guy did a pirate ship craft at our local library’s story hour, and for some reason, that tiny little coincidence—two pirate ships in a single day!—sent my brain down quite the rabbit trail. That spark of inspiration ended up being pretty subtle on the page, but I might not have come up with the idea at all if not for being in such a pirate-y headspace that day.

[Insert Kit squeeing here because Shy Guy Beach is my absolute favorite MarioKart track ever! Excellent piece of trivia!]

KIT: What gives you the most joy about your life as a YA writer right now? What is bringing you satisfaction at this moment in time?

KAYLA: My editor sent a few finished copies my way recently, and it was so surreal to hold them! Even better, though, was the moment I showed my husband and little guy their names in the dedication and acknowledgments—I’d kept both a surprise, and I’m glad I did. I’ll never forget how excited they both were.

KIT: The publishing journey is unique for every author, but it’s safe to say that the road to book publication is filled with surprises, twists, and turns for all of us. What has surprised you most about the process of putting a first book into the world?

KAYLA: Having been on said twisty, turny road* (*and by road, I definitely mean roller coaster) for a long time now, I felt reasonably prepared for many aspects of publishing, but there have certainly been surprises along the way. One that stands out about the actual process of putting a book out there is that I was not prepared to love my copy editor so much, let alone the entire process of doing copyedits! I was afraid of getting paired with someone who wouldn’t get my voice/style, but the person they gave me was the perfect match. I just wanted to hug them by the end of the draft—I never realized how satisfying it would be to delete commas! I was also beyond impressed at one note that said, “You used this phrase 100 pages ago; okay?” I sincerely hope I get paired with the same person for my next book!

KIT: Drawing from your own unique experience, what advice would you to give to future young adult debut authors, or debut novelists in general?

KAYLA: There are only twenty-four hours in each day, innumerable things that will vie for your time, and only one of you—don’t despair if you are unable to clone yourself. Make lists to keep track of things (I highly recommend creating a bullet journal!), give yourself more hours than you think you’ll need to fulfill your various commitments and deadlines, then prioritize the truly important and not just the urgent. Do your very best work—but when it comes down to it, if your mental/emotional/physical health is suffering, take a step back and breathe.

Kayla Olson lives in Texas, and can usually be found in near proximity to black coffee, the darkest chocolate, Scrivener, and an army of Sharpie highlighters. Her YA debut, The Sandcastle Empire, is a near-future sci-fi thriller about a global war that erupts in the wake of environmental change (HarperTeen / June 6, 2017); when main character Eden escapes to the only neutral ground left in the world, Sanctuary Island, she quickly discovers the island might be deadlier than the world she left behind—but surviving it is the only thing that stands between her and freedom.

Website | Twitter

Kit Frick is a novelist, poet, and MacDowell Colony fellow. Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, she studied creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College and received her MFA from Syracuse University. When she isn’t putting complicated characters in impossible situations, Kit edits poetry and literary fiction for a small press, edits for private clients, and mentors emerging writers through Pitch Wars. Her debut young adult novel is See All the Stars (Simon & Schuster / Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2018).

The Sandcastle Empire is out now and is available wherever books are sold. Allow me to recommend your local indie, in addition to Barnes & Noble and Amazon.

Stop back soon for future posts in the Debut-to-Debut Interview Series. I’ll be talking to Emily Bain Murphy in July, Rebecca Barrow in August, and more fantastic authors in the fall, winter, and beyond!

Karen M. McManus :: ONE OF US IS LYING

Hello, friends! Welcome to the second interview in the Debut-to-Debut Series! ICYMI the first time around (and you can check out Katie Bayerl’s interview right here), I’m talking to a fantastic group of debut young adult novelists throughout 2017, 2018, and 2019—the year leading up to, during, and following my own debut. I’m so excited to share these books, and insights into these authors’ experiences, with you.

This month, I corresponded with Karen M. McManus about her debut young adult novel One of Us Is Lying (Random House / Delacorte Press, 2017).

From the jacket:

One of Us Is Lying is the story of what happens when five strangers walk into detention and only four walk out alive. Everyone is a suspect, and everyone has something to hide.

Pay close attention and you might solve this.

On Monday afternoon, five students at Bayview High walk into detention.

Bronwyn, the brain, is Yale-bound and never breaks a rule.
Addy, the beauty, is the picture-perfect homecoming princess.
Nate, the criminal, is already on probation for dealing.
Cooper, the athlete, is the all-star baseball pitcher.
And Simon, the outcast, is the creator of Bayview High’s notorious gossip app.

Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom. Before the end of detention Simon’s dead. And according to investigators, his death wasn’t an accident. On Monday, he died. But on Tuesday, he’d planned to post juicy reveals about all four of his high-profile classmates, which makes all four of them suspects in his murder. Or are they the perfect patsies for a killer who’s still on the loose?

Everyone has secrets, right? What really matters is how far you would go to protect them.

KIT FRICK: When Simon walks into detention and doesn’t walk out, his four detention-mates become suspects in his murder. One of Us Is Lying is written from the points of view of those four high school students: Bronwyn, Addy, Nate, and Cooper. Tell us a little about writing a multi-POV novel. What was your writing process like for developing four distinct point of view characters?

KAREN M. McMANUS: When I got the idea for One of Us Is Lying, I thought about the mystery first: What would happen if five students walked into detention and only four walked out? How could you kill somebody in a closed room like that? And why would you do it? The concept was interesting to me, but it didn’t really come to life until I started imagining the characters that would populate that room.

I knew from the start that I wanted it to be multi-POV, which was something I’d never attempted before. There was something almost magical about that part of the process, because all four of them sprang into my mind fully formed. I wrote the first couple chapters in a frenzy to get them onto the page. I’ve revised those pages a lot since, but the initial characterizations still ring true.

As I continued to write, I had separate music playlists for every character, and I used them to help switch my perspective while writing. I also tried to give each character pet expressions and thought/speech patterns that were specific to them.

KIT: One of my favorite parts about One of Us Is Lying was trying to keep up with the novel’s twists and turns! Where did you draw your inspiration for your twisty, suspense-filled debut?

KAREN: Growing up, I loved Agatha Christie—all those red herrings and dun-dun-DUUUN moments. When I was querying, I comped One of Us Is Lying to Pretty Little Liars and Murder on the Orient Express, which is an odd combination, but accurate.

As I was writing, I thought a lot about layers—how each of the characters were hiding something from the outside world, but they were also hiding things from themselves. So even once their secrets are exposed, you don’t know everything about them.

KIT: Tell us something about One of Us Is Lying that isn’t apparent from the book cover or flap copy. We want the inside scoop!

KAREN: Cooper is named after a guy I worked with for about a month when I first graduated from college. I was temping at a paralegal firm with a bunch of other recent graduates, and we were all in one big room answering phones all day. Cooper was from Alabama, and every time he picked up the phone, he’d say “This is Kew-pur” in a great southern drawl. So when I imagined a southern baseball player, his name had to be Cooper. It’s funny how people you barely know can stick with you like that.

KIT: What gives you the most joy about your life as a YA writer right now? Tell us about something that brings you satisfaction at this moment in time.

KAREN: I love hearing from readers who are enjoying the book! I got the most amazing email a while back from a teacher who’d picked up an ARC at a convention. She said the copy was falling apart because it had been passed around so much, and once it was her turn to read, students checked in with her every day to see where she was in the plot. She thanked me for helping create a lifelong love of reading in her classroom, at which point I basically dissolved into happy tears.

KIT: The publishing journey is unique for every author, but it’s safe to say that the road to book publication is filled with plenty of surprises and the occasional curve-ball for all of us. What has surprised you most about the process of putting a first book into the world?

KAREN: I was surprised by how much I came to enjoy revising. Okay, enjoy might be too strong of a word, but I didn’t hate it nearly as much as I normally do. Drafting has always been my happy place, while revisions were something to suffer through. I could never tell if my changes were actually making the story better. Working with my editor cut through that murkiness, and I could see the book getting stronger with each round, which was satisfying.

KIT: Drawing from your own unique experience, what advice would you to give to future young adult debut authors, or debut novelists in general?

KAREN: It’s the same advice I give to querying authors—make friends! Publishing a first novel is a rollercoaster of highs and lows, so support from others at the same stage of the writing/publishing journey, or a little further along, is invaluable. I think a lot of first-time authors have imposter syndrome, and secretly believe that they crashed a party everyone else was invited to. Connecting with debut friends helps ease that self-doubt.

Karen M. McManus earned her BA in English from the College of the Holy Cross and her MA in journalism from Northeastern University. Her debut young adult novel, One of Us Is Lying, releases from Delacorte Press/Random House in May 2017, and will be published internationally in 18 territories. Karen’s work is represented by Rosemary Stimola of Stimola Literary Studio.

Website | Twitter

Kit Frick is a novelist, poet, and MacDowell Colony fellow. Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, she studied creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College and received her MFA from Syracuse University. When she isn’t putting complicated characters in impossible situations, Kit edits poetry and literary fiction for a small press, edits for private clients, and mentors emerging writers through Pitch Wars. Her debut young adult novel is See All the Stars (Simon & Schuster / Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2018).

One of Us Is Lying releases today—May 30, 2017—and is available wherever books are sold. Allow me to recommend your local indie, in addition to Amazon.

Stop back soon for future posts in the Debut-to-Debut Interview Series. We have a fantastic line-up of debut authors scheduled for June, July, August, and beyond!

Katie Bayerl :: A PSALM FOR LOST GIRLS

I could not be more excited to share with you the inaugural post in the Debut-to-Debut Interview Series. Interviews will be posted sporadically throughout 2017, 2018, and 2019—the year leading up to, during, and following my own debut. I hope to connect with a wide-ranging group of debut young adult novelists through this series and to share their books and experiences with you: fellow writers, fellow debuts, fellow readers, fellow YA enthusiasts.

This month, I corresponded with Katie Bayerl about her debut young adult novel A Psalm for Lost Girls (Penguin / Putnam, 2017).

From the jacket:

Tess da Costa is a saint—a hand-to-god, miracle-producing saint. At least that’s what the people in her hometown of New Avon, Massachusetts, seem to believe. And when Tess suddenly and tragically passes away, her small city begins feverishly petitioning the Pope to make Tess’s sainthood official. Tess’s mother is ecstatic over the fervor, while her sister Callie, the one who knew Tess best, is disgusted—overcome with the feeling that her sister is being stolen from her all over again.

The fervor for Tess’s sainthood only grows when Ana Langone, a local girl who’s been missing for six months, is found alive at the foot of one of Tess’s shrines. It’s the final straw for Callie.

With the help of Tess’s secret boyfriend Danny, Callie’s determined to prove that Tess was something far more important than a saint; she was her sister, her best friend and a girl in love with a boy. But Callie’s investigation uncovers much more than she bargained for: a hidden diary, old family secrets, and even the disturbing truth behind Ana’s kidnapping.

Without further ado…

KIT FRICK: A Psalm for Lost Girls is told through three voicesThe novel’s primary narrator is Callie, who must navigate the aftermath of her sister Tess’s tragic death and her hometown’s fervor to petition for Tess’s sainthood. But we also get pieces of the story through the diary entries that Tess left behind and through an omniscient voice privy to the experience of Ana, a local girl who is—possibly miraculously—found after six months missing. Tell us a bit about your writing process for developing a first person primary narrator, a second narrator who speaks to us only through her journals, and a third-person omniscient point of view. Did you always know your book would include all three, or did any evolve through the revision process?

KATIE BAYERL: I’d like to say it was all part of my master plan. The novel began as a (third person!) short story in the voice of Callie, the skeptical, grief-stricken sister. Once I realized it was a novel, I knew I wanted to include Tess’s voice too, but it took a few drafts—and a failed attempt—before I found a way to make it work. (She’s dead at the outset of the story, after all.) Ana Langone, the missing child, appeared in early drafts as a nameless child who’d been miraculously healed, and as the novel took shape, I realized there was more to her story.

I can see now that the three voices were all there in the beginning, but writing this novel felt like carving a statue out of stone. It took a lot of chipping away before the story emerged in its full form. In the end, I think the three girls provide important, complementary perspectives. Callie is the raw emotion and grit, Tess offers heart and humor, and Ana’s third-person narration adds an ethereal, suspenseful layer. I’ve come to think of them as a holy trinity of sorts, a metaphor that feels appropriate.

KIT: Religion—particularly Christianity and the phenomenon of sainthood—plays an important role in the novel. For some in the book’s setting of New Avon, Massachusetts, including Tess and Callie’s mother, religion provides both a comfort and a sense of purpose following Tess’s death. But for others, particularly Callie, the town’s zeal to petition for her sister’s sainthood is a source of pain and outrage. Tell us a little about your interest in saints, psalms, and miracles, and the research you did when writing your debut.

KATIE: I grew up Catholic in an era when the saints were hardly discussed, and I was pretty fed up with the Virgin Mary as the only available female role model. (The way her story was told, it seemed like the poor woman never had a unique thought of her own!) I began combing through other faiths for more spirited female icons. That search—and the friction it caused with various adults—was a huge part of my teen years.

It was my study abroad semester in the Dominican Republic that put sainthood into a new light for me. I encountered another conception of sainthood there—a blend of Catholic and West African traditions known as santería—that knocked me flat. That’s when I first realized that lady saints didn’t have to be bland or docile. They could be powerful, flawed, complex. I was hooked. From that point on, everywhere I’ve traveled I’ve hunted for images and stories of lady saints. The idea for this novel was born during one of those trips—to the site that commemorates the “child saints” of Fátima, Portugal.

I read quite a bit about saints and miracles as I worked on the novel—most of it for inspiration or to sort out specific details. The two books that most influenced my thinking were The Miracle Detective by Randall Sullivan, a journalistic dive into how miracles are investigated by the Catholic church, and Muses, Madmen & Prophets by Daniel Smith, an historical take on voice hearing and its many interpretations.

KIT: Tell us something about A Psalm for Lost Girls that isn’t apparent from the book cover or flap copy. We want the inside scoop!

KATIE: I became a ruthless cutter and shed many favorite scenes along the way. The darling I mourned most was Tess’s visit to a psychic named Miss Edna who tries to help her come to terms with her gift. It was a tragic scene in a lot of ways but also cracked me up.

KIT: What gives you the most joy about your life as a YA writer right now? What is bringing you satisfaction at this moment in time?

KATIE: I’m really enjoying how enthusiastic my family and friends are about this book! For so long, writing was this weird thing I did that I really only talked about with other writers, but now that the book’s out there, my parents, aunties, cousins, and friends are all out hitting the streets, telling everyone who will listen about my book. It’s adorable.

KIT: The publishing journey is unique for every author, but it’s safe to say that the road to book publication is filled with surprises, twists, and turns for all of us. What has surprised you most about the process of putting a first book into the world?

KATIE: The time it took? If anyone had told me how many years lay ahead of me when I first started pursuing writing seriously, I might have given up on the spot. In hindsight, I needed that time to develop my craft . . . but I truly had no idea how much I had to learn or what a strange, winding process it would be—at every single stage.

KIT: Drawing from your own unique experience, what advice would you to give to future young adult debut authors, or debut novelists in general?

KATIE: Throw away your timelines. Time is irrelevant. You’ll get to where you need to be. Just focus on the step ahead of you, and do the work that your story is asking of you. Do your story proud.

When Katie Bayerl isn’t penning stories, she coaches teens and nonprofits to tell theirs. She holds an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from Vermont College of Fine Arts and has taught creative writing in schools and a variety of community settings. She currently leads the VCFA Young Writers Network and teaches classes for teens at GrubStreet. Katie has an incurable obsession with saints, bittersweet ballads, and murder. A Psalm for Lost Girls (spring 2017, Putnam) is her first novel.

 

 

Kit Frick is a novelist, poet, and MacDowell Colony fellow. Originally from Pittsburgh, PA, she studied creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College and received her MFA from Syracuse University. When she isn’t putting complicated characters in impossible situations, Kit edits poetry and literary fiction for a small press, edits for private clients, and mentors emerging writers through Pitch Wars. Her debut young adult novel is See All the Stars (Simon & Schuster / Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2018).

A Psalm for Lost Girls released on March 14, 2017 and is available wherever books are sold. Allow me to recommend your local indie, in addition to Amazon.

Stop back for future posts in the Debut-to-Debut Interview Series in the coming months!